About Our Airport

More details about Clark Regional Airport

The Clark Regional Airport serves Clark County Indiana and Metro Louisville, Kentucky and is owned by the South Central Regional Airport Authority. The airport has two runways, the longest of which is 5500 feet. At an elevation of 474 feet, Clark Regional Airport is located just 7 miles north of Louisville, Kentucky.

Our Runways

The Clark Regional Airport serves Clark County Indiana and Metro Louisville, Kentucky and is owned by the Clark Regional Aviation Authority. The airport has two runways, the longest of which is 5500 feet. At an elevation of 474 feet, Clark Regional Airport is located just 7 miles north of Louisville, Kentucky.

Runway 18-36: 5500 Feet / 1676 Meters
Runway 14-32: 3899 Feet / 1188 Meters

Landing Fees

There is a landing/ramp fee that is based on the size of the aircraft. The Landing/Usage Fee is collected by the Fixed Base Operators (FBO’s) and remitted to the Aviation Authority monthly. These fees help support the airport and the planned airport expansion.

  • Twin engine piston aircraft over 6,000 lbs. — $25.00
  • Turbo Prop aircraft (single or multi-engine) under 12,500 lbs. — $25.00
  • Turbo Prop aircraft (single or multi-engine) (12,500 lbs. and above) — $35.00
  • Turbo Jet/Fan aircraft under 12,500 lbs. — $35.00
  • Turbo Jet/Fan aircraft 12,501 to 30,000 lbs. — $65.00
  • Turbo Jet/Fan aircraft 30,001 lbs. and above — $95.00
  • Helicopter — $25.00

Exclusions, Modifications, or Adjustments: All angel flights, student flights, Maintenance Flights, and any other flights approved in advance by the Authority or the Airport Manager shall be exempt from the landing/parking fee. The Authority and/or the Airport Manager also reserve the right to negotiate landing/parking fees outside of the above fee schedule for aircraft that make multiple landings at the Airport on a regular basis (i.e., at least eight (8) landings during any given month).

Keep Your Eyes Open for Formation Flying

The Kentucky Air Guard’s 123rd Airlift Wing wants those who use Clark Regional Airport to be aware of their frequent flights in the Kentucky/Indiana region. The 123rd conducts low-level “tactical” training throughout Kentucky and Indiana. Normally this is accomplished in formation with flights consisting of two aircraft, however, flights may have up to six aircraft and can be up to five miles long. Only the lead aircraft will have its transponder on, so don’t assume there is only one C-130 because you only see one on your TCAS (if available).

If you see one C-130, look 2,000 to 6,000 feet in front or behind for others. The low-level routes flown are random around Fort Knox Army Airfield and Camp Atterbury Joint Maneuver Training Center, near Edinburgh, Indiana. The C-130s fly these regions typically from 300 AGL to 4,000 MSL at speeds of up to 240 KIAS under VFR and IFR conditions. They use ATC flight following whenever possible, but due to the low altitude, radar services are usually terminated leaving the Louisville airspace.

Listen up for the DERBY call-sign. This is a good indicator that low-level operations are being conducted. A single ship will use the DERBY ## call sign. A formation flight will use the DERBY ## FLIGHT call sign. The 123rd conducts C-130 operations from the Guard Ramp at Louisville International Airport (KSDF). The heaviest amount of C-130 traffic usually occurs on Tuesday’s and Thursdays between 1300 and 2200 EST and on unit training assembly weekends. However, flights are flown almost every day.

Traffic pattern altitudes at airfields are typically 1,000 AGL for rectangular patterns and 1,500 AGL for overhead approaches, 4,000 AGL for random steep approaches and 500 AGL for random shallow approaches. The C-130 approach speeds can be as slow as 105 KIAS during tactical assault landings and as high as 155 KIAS during a flaps-up landing. During formation rectangular patterns, 200 KIAS is maintained during the downwind leg. During overhead approaches, 200 KIAS is maintained from the initial point to the break point. Refer to AIM 5-4-6 for the overhead approaches.

For wake turbulence, the C-130 is a medium category aircraft. When two C-130 aircraft are taxiing in formation, the wake could pose a hazard to smaller aircraft taxiing in trail. For example, at 500 feet behind the C-130 propellers, the wake velocity can reach 69 knots.